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January 4, 2010
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Cemlyn Bay Stars - updated by Photosbykev Cemlyn Bay Stars - updated by Photosbykev
94 30 second exposures and then lens filter iced over even with a len warmer running.

Uploaded as a 1920px file so you can see some detail and print file being added.

There is a Quadrantid meteor on right hand edge of the frame www.flickr.com/photos/23362014@N06/4245481222/

Canon 7D with 10-22mm lens f4.5 iso 200

Wylfa power station is in the bottom right hand corner.

updated to improve the clarity of the image by processing all of the 94 raw files to tiff files before stacking and final processing
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:iconjpmh21:
jpmh21 Featured By Owner May 9, 2010  Professional Photographer
This beautiful deviation was featured here: [link]
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:iconflyy1:
Flyy1 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
I have featured this deviation in my journal... [link]


Hope you don't mind.
:)
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:iconb-a88:
b-a88 Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2010
Hmm, didn't know it was possible to get star trails form separate exposures like that. :D
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:iconphotosbykev:
Photosbykev Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
it's a good way of controlling light pollution and it gives you some control over the foreground exposure :)
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:iconb-a88:
b-a88 Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2010
Those are very big problems for those types of shots usually. Does it have any different effect on battery life as opposed to one long exposure?
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:iconphotosbykev:
Photosbykev Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
it helps battery life :) You shoot 30 second exposures with NR turned off and then shoot a dark frame at the end. To blend them together I use Startrails.exe
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:iconb-a88:
b-a88 Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2010
That's good to hear, I was thinking of trying a star trail photo but after researching how to do it I found out it would require a really long exposure which I found out would kill my battery after a few hours. Then not to mention the light pollution here, most everything turns reddish after not very long. :D
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:iconphotosbykev:
Photosbykev Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
if you take a dark frame at the start of the sequence you can use that as a backup and shoot until your battery dies. Ideally I would take dark frames before and after the sequence and use them both in the post processing
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:iconb-a88:
b-a88 Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2010
It wasn't that long ago that I figured out there was a setting on my camera to have it automatically take a dark frame but I guess that setting doesn't exactly work for this application unless it is one long exposure and then the battery life is a big consideration. I've never really been able to figure out how exactly to do dark frames manually, I guess just take a shot with the lens cap on but then I don't know how exactly to subtract the dark frame, I really should've looked that up before now. :XD:

My biggest problem is getting the stars in focus, it's completely a game of luck with the low light levels and the small viewfinder. The thing that got them in focus the best so far was a smaller aperture but then you lose a lot of the stars from the sky. :hmm:
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:iconphotosbykev:
Photosbykev Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
a few tips for you :)
1. Use Startrails.exe to compile all of your imae sequence. You can load your dark frames (taken with the lens cap on at the same exposure as your main frames) into Startrails and it will do the subtraction for you.
2. Don't focus on infinity :) Use an online hyperfocal distance calculator to work out the the distance to set your lens to based on it's focal length and aperture so that infinity is in focus and also some of the foreground. With a 10mm lens on my 7D if I focus at about 12' @ f4 inifnity is sharp and some foreground. Using f4 @ iso 200 with 30 second exposures will give you a good starting place for the correct exposure.
3. Before you commit to a long sequence set the camera to bulb and a high iso say 3200iso and shoot a single exposure for 2-3 minutes. This exposure, will normally be overexposed BUT, can be used to check focus, composition and will let you see anything, like power cables, that you might not of seen before starting.

4. Remember to reset your camera and double check ALL the settings before starting the sequence.
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